Made in Houston

Kennon Evett
ARTISAN SKATEBOARD Jake Eshelman of Side Project Skateboards hand-makes boards in three designs, including this classic cruiser that combines recovered walnut and maple and is finished off with two coats of varnish. It sells for $395, online only. With sustainability in mind, the boards are made in a Bellaire wood shop where much of the discarded wood is sourced — courtesy of Eshelman’s father-in-law and woodwork mentor, who himself rode wooden skateboards around Houston in the ’60s — and are fastened with leather risers in lieu of commonplace plastic. Like an artist would sign a painting, Eshelman laser-etches his company logo on the bottom of each one.
ARTISAN SKATEBOARD Jake Eshelman of Side Project Skateboards hand-makes boards in three designs, including this classic cruiser that combines recovered walnut and maple and is finished off with two coats of varnish. It sells for $395, online only. With sustainability in mind, the boards are made in a Bellaire wood shop where much of the discarded wood is sourced — courtesy of Eshelman’s father-in-law and woodwork mentor, who himself rode wooden skateboards around Houston in the ’60s — and are fastened with leather risers in lieu of commonplace plastic. Like an artist would sign a painting, Eshelman laser-etches his company logo on the bottom of each one.

H-Town is known far and wide for making spaceships and tacos, and how cool is that? Rockets and Tex-Mex aside, however, a range of other audacious objects, proprietary products and otherwise stupendous stuff is developed, dreamed up and done well, here in Houston. Here’s a portfolio of items, from tiny little carrier ships and carbon fibers to great big diamond necklaces, concocted and created in our own backyard. Grab a taco, read on, and be proud of your city.


ABOVE: 

Artisan Skateboard

Jake Eshelman of Side Project Skateboards hand-makes boards in three designs, including this classic cruiser that combines recovered walnut and maple and is finished off with two coats of varnish. It sells for $395, online only. With sustainability in mind, the boards are made in a Bellaire wood shop where much of the discarded wood is sourced — courtesy of Eshelman’s father-in-law and woodwork mentor, who himself rode wooden skateboards around Houston in the ’60s — and are fastened with leather risers in lieu of commonplace plastic. Like an artist would sign a painting, Eshelman laser-etches his company logo on the bottom of each one. 

Art+Culture

“I WISH I came here sooner to experience this amazing city,” says advanced sommelier Rachel Van Til of her move to Houston just one year before the pandemic lockdown. When Covid appeared in 2020, along with layoffs and closings, it led to a career swerve for Van Til, a working mom who was a sommelier at Pappas Steakhouse. She took over the wine program at The Clubs at Houston Oaks, a posh (initiation fees can range into the six figures) members-only club northwest of the city with 10 lodges, 17 lakes, 900 acres and six dining options. Speaking of lots of good food and vino, the club’s 2022 Wine and Food Classic is this February 12 — it’s a great chance to taste hundreds of wines from around the world and learn about them from winemakers and professionals. “It’s our largest event of the year and it’s open to the public.” In our Q&A, Rachel dishes on her favorite date night, best wines to try this year and her brush with the me-too movement!

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HOUSTON IS HOME to hundreds of steakhouses, but the Museum District has been pretty barren of big beef — until now.

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