Podcaster Asks, ‘Why Should I Not Move to Houston?’ Here’s What Twitter Had to Say

OVER THE WEEKEND, DC-based attorney, podcaster and best-selling author Rabia Chaudry, who first rose to prominence on Season 1 of the pioneering podcast Serial, tweeted that she wanted to move to Houston. "It's diverse, affordable, I'm tired of being cold in the DMV, no state income tax, and the food there is some of the best I'd had in America," she said. "I only want to hear from ppl who live in, or have lived in, Houston: Why should I not move there?"


Twitter, naturally, mobilized, with thousands of replies pouring in.

Humidity topped the list of reasons given, as did Ted Cruz and Governor Abbott. (To which Chaudry replied, "My governor is Hogan and he ain't doing much for me anyway.")

One person succinctly listed "hurricanes, humidity, roaches, very flat, fire ants." And

Nicole Flores elaborates a bit: "Do you like humidity? Can you kill a flying roach? Are you ok with driving everywhere (very few neighborhoods are walkable)? Very very diverse. Low cost of living. People can be a bit rough around the edges and insular. Fresh seafood if you eat that. Food scene A+." She followed up with, "Forgot to mention fire ants and water moccasins."

User @htownmark explained that Houstonians "have to work a little bit to find natural beauty," and tacked on "hot AF." He also said, "If you live inside the loop you will have to navigate the HISD magnet school system, brave your zoned school, or pay for private. But it's worth it."

Meanwhile, another user joked, "I don't think the power is back on there."

And law student and military vet Erik Esqueda offered, "The biggest drawbacks: We're prone to flooding, the Texas weather here is just as chaotic as the other parts of the state, you better buy a good car and have podcast to listen to in traffic. But I love this city."


Art + Entertainment

“I WISH I came here sooner to experience this amazing city,” says advanced sommelier Rachel Van Til of her move to Houston just one year before the pandemic lockdown. When Covid appeared in 2020, along with layoffs and closings, it led to a career swerve for Van Til, a working mom who was a sommelier at Pappas Steakhouse. She took over the wine program at The Clubs at Houston Oaks, a posh (initiation fees can range into the six figures) members-only club northwest of the city with 10 lodges, 17 lakes, 900 acres and six dining options. Speaking of lots of good food and vino, the club’s 2022 Wine and Food Classic is this February 12 — it’s a great chance to taste hundreds of wines from around the world and learn about them from winemakers and professionals. “It’s our largest event of the year and it’s open to the public.” In our Q&A, Rachel dishes on her favorite date night, best wines to try this year and her brush with the me-too movement!

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