Episode of National Travel Show Explores Houston — on a Budget

NOW MORE THAN ever, people are catching the travel bug. And equally of-the-moment is the need for a budget. A new weekly digital series hosted by YouTube personality and television writer George Igoe explores U.S. cities with a daily allowance of $100, and in this week's video, Igoe checks out Houston.


In this fast-paced episode of George Goes Everywhere, Igoe offers viewers ideas across six categories: "history, art, food, drink, nature — and a sixth one I'm not sure how to categorize, but we'll get to that," he says. He begins with a tour of Space Center Houston, "the crown jewel of the city's space heritage," and splurges on some astronaut ice cream, naturally, before heading to Irma's, which he dubs "the perfect combination of good food and kitsch."

George Goes Everywhere - "Houston"

Igoe — who has written for Family Guy and The Cleveland Show, and developed the showRich Travel/Poor Travel — also explores the bayous, which are, admittedly, not the city's most telegenic feature, and goes on an Orange Show adventure.

Houston proves to be extremely budget-friendly, as Igoe winds up with some extra funds, which he donates to a special cause (his sixth "category"). Check out the entire episode — as well as others that document adventures in New Orleans, Boston and beyond — on the Million Stories website, a new and free financial literacy entertainment outlet.

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