Banner ad
H-Town rap artist and producer Timothy Russell, aka GUILLA, may have only released Children of the Sun — a sci-fi-inspired album that includes a collaborative track with HGO soprano Alicia Gianni — last spring, but the 28-year-old, quick-witted rap artist already has a followup dropping this month. His fourth full-length album, Crunchy Roll & Chill, features 14 tracks that are more biographical in nature — there’s a track about his love for girls who cosplay — than his previous, highly esoteric work. It’s also less heavy in tone. “I feel like we’re in a time of extreme darkness right now and everybody is kind of pissed off,” says Russell, who plans on touring Texas this summer, “so Crunchy Roll & Chill is full of upbeat music. I want to put smiles on people’s faces again.”
H-Town rap artist and producer Timothy Russell, aka GUILLA, may have only released Children of the Sun — a sci-fi-inspired album that includes a collaborative track with HGO soprano Alicia Gianni — last spring, but the 28-year-old, quick-witted rap artist already has a followup dropping this month. His fourth full-length album, Crunchy Roll & Chill, features 14 tracks that are more biographical in nature — there’s a track about his love for girls who cosplay — than his previous, highly esoteric work. It’s also less heavy in tone. “I feel like we’re in a time of extreme darkness right now and everybody is kind of pissed off,” says Russell, who plans on touring Texas this summer, “so Crunchy Roll & Chill is full of upbeat music. I want to put smiles on people’s faces again.”

H-Town rap artist and producer Timothy Russell, aka Guilla, may have only released Children of the Sun — a sci-fi-inspired album that includes a collaborative track with HGO soprano Alicia Gianni — last spring, but the 28-year-old, quick-witted rap artist already has a followup dropping this month. His fourth full-length album, Crunchy Roll & Chill, features 14 tracks that are more biographical in nature — there’s a track about his love for girls who cosplay — than his previous, highly esoteric work. It’s also less heavy in tone. “I feel like we’re in a time of extreme darkness right now and everybody is kind of pissed off,” says Russell, who plans on touring Texas this summer, “so Crunchy Roll & Chill is full of upbeat music. I want to put smiles on people’s faces again.”


Guilla is a self-professed nerd and a part-time tennis instructor. He wears the Houston shirt, $38, by Alchemy Design; denim bomber jacket, $340, by Universal Works; and sunglasses, $135, by Raen Wiley, all at Stag Provisions.      

Click here to see our full portfolio of Houston's diverse music scene 

Special
Banner ad

Even in a pandemic, the arts culture of Houston never stops — from movie screenings in the wee hours of the morning, to public art installations that light up the night. Seven photographers capture the everyday wonders of art in the most resilient city in America, over the course of 24 hours on Saturday, Oct. 3.


Keep Reading Show less
Art + Entertainment

The performing arts have been brought to a screeching halt as a result of the ongoing pandemic. The Houston Brass Quintet, a local nonprofit music troupe, met the moment head-on with outdoor pop-up concerts around the city. Their perseverance has helped keep their heads above water, and the group is gearing up for a holiday season unlike any other.

The chamber group focuses on diverse music genres, prioritizes collaboration in the arts community, and gives back to the community through educational and service programs. Founding member and managing director Sarah Perkins beams as she discusses the service component of the quintet. "The group was originally formed as a one-off for a party," she says. "A gentleman approached me at the party and asked if I was interested in putting a chamber group together, and he gave us $5,000 to get started. With the seed money we got, we decided to make our group a nonprofit, because the mission aspect was important to me — to have a service component involved, with particular emphasis on the Alzheimer's and dementia community."

Keep Reading Show less
Art + Entertainment
Banner ad