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That’s Crafty!

Houston’s HopDrop Delivers Hard-to-Find Beer

Screen Shot 2020-03-25 at 1.00.55 PM
Screen Shot 2020-03-25 at 1.00.55 PM

The owners of Houston-based HopDrop are sensing a new chapter is brewing for the two-year-old biz. This past week has been the busiest in company history for HopDrop, which sources craft beers from all over the city and brings them directly to your door — a former convenience that is now a necessity.


Houston’s craft-brew scene has rapidly expanded over the last several years, both in quantity and in geography. Lots are in hip inner-city ’hoods, and several others still are 30-plus miles outside of town, providing a fun all-day destination for beer-lovers —  but a challenging journey for others. “I liked trying out all the awesome breweries that Houston has to offer, but I have three kids and I live in Katy,” says founder Mike Francis, who figured there were a lot of other folks who shared this problem. Francis points out that the benefits of HopDrop go two ways: Houston-area residents are thrilled to get the beer they crave without having to leave their house, while breweries are equally excited to continue serving their customer base. “Everyone always has a big smile when you bring them beer.”

More than 300 beers from Spindletap, Southern Star, B52 and other craft breweries are available to shop via HopDrop’s website. Search by brewery, style, packaging or even ABV.  To complete an order, customers must sign up for the company’s “Draft Wagon” program. For a one-time charge of $8.99, get unlimited deliveries for a month (each delivery, however, comes with a $6 processing and delivery fee). Or for a $14.95 monthly subscription (or $120 for a full year), enjoy unlimited deliveries (fee-free!) and access to special limited-release beers from local breweries.

Currently, HopDrop is focusing on any and all Houston breweries, including classics like 8th Wonder and newcomers like Urban South. “We like up-and-coming breweries, too, because it gives them a shot at expanding their customer base. They can get ‘regulars’ that are 50 miles away that order every week,” Francis explains. “Our brewery friends are in a difficult time, and we are trying to do all we can to help.”

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