Ballet Building Officially Named in Honor of Margaret Alkek Williams at Downtown Fete

Wilson Parish
Ballet Building Officially Named in Honor of Margaret Alkek Williams at Downtown Fete

Jim Nelson, Margaret Alkek Williams and Stanton Welch

IT'S OFFICIAL! THE Downtown Houston building that houses Houston Ballet has been named the Margaret Alkek Williams Center for Dance building, and a group of Williams’ friends and Ballet faithful gathered there to celebrate.


The Houston Ballet announced in May that Williams, perhaps the Houston cultural scene’s more generous patron, had made a $10 million legacy gift to the company. “This philanthropic commitment was directed to the Houston Ballet Endowment and provides unrestricted support to maintain the Ballet’s home and ensure the Houston Ballet’s mission to inspire a lasting love of dance flourish in permanence,” noted a Ballet rep.

“In honor of Margaret Alkek Williams’ legendary devotion to the Houston Ballet, the home of the Houston Ballet, standing six stories tall at the entrance of downtown Houston, was named the Margaret Alkek Williams Center for Dance.”

About 80 guests turned up to mark the occasion and honor Williams in the building’s lobby, decorated with florals in the grand dame’s favorite shades of pink and purple. “To be able to do this for the Houston Ballet means so much to me,” said Margaret Alkek Williams. “I am honored that you are all here to celebrate with me, and I thank you for joining me in supporting the Ballet.”

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