Innovative Houston DNA Lab Helps Solve 40-Year-Old Mystery on Hit New Podcast

HOUSTON-BASED OTHRAM lab recently solved the cold case of an unidentified baby found in a Jackson County, Mississippi river in 1982. The case is the focus of the new podcast "Solvable," which is currently the No. 1 podcast on Apple Podcasts.


Amanda Reno, a genetic genealogist, and Greg Bodker, a law enforcement professional for over 25 years, host the new podcast, where the two work to solve cold cases they feel can benefit from a fresh perspective and new DNA technology. In their first 10-episode season, the pair focus on an 18-month-old Baby Jane found in Mississippi in 1982. With the help of Houston-based Othram lab, the two investigators identify the baby and meet with her family to uncover what happened to Baby Jane.

‎Solvable by audiochuck on Apple Podcastspodcasts.apple.com

Othram was founded by David Mittelman — who spent five years working on the Human Genome Project — in 2018. The first private lab ever built to apply the power of modern DNA sequencing to forensic evidence, Othram specializes in cases where very small amounts of DNA are available or where the materials in need of testing are degraded or contaminated — all factors that hinder the testing process at traditional crime labs.

The company also recently started DNAsolves.com, where people from all over the world can voluntarily donate their DNA to be entered into their database in order to help identify other Jane Does and help solve other crimes. Mittelman told the Houston Chronicle in 2019, "I'm betting on the fact that there are enough people in this country who want to do their civic duty and are as excited as I am to give a voice to the nameless."

"Solvable" is part of the Audiochuck network, which also hosts the nation's top crime podcast, "Crime Junkie." It's available for streaming wherever you get your podcasts.

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