Cowboy Calling

In 2016, Neil Holmes was bucked off a bull named Rodeo Time, landing lifelessly in the dirt. Some thought he might actually be dead. No stranger to concussions or broken bones, the 32-year-old professional rider — a two-time Professional Bull Riders World Finals qualifier — has spent the months since cultivating physical and mental toughness, and looks forward to proving his strength at this year’s Rodeo Houston. But in addition to healing and training hard, this dad of four has prioritized time to give back: He teamed up with fellow cowboys during Harvey, traveling by boat through North Houston to rescue stranded folks, and is helming a PBR effort to teach inner-city children about rodeo sports and Western culture. Holmes, who stands at just five-foot-six, hopes to show kiddos — including his own — that with faith and confidence, anything is possible. Even bucking death.

Phoebe Rourke
IMG_4984-Edit-Edit
IMG_4984-Edit-Edit
Art+Culture

“I WISH I came here sooner to experience this amazing city,” says advanced sommelier Rachel Van Til of her move to Houston just one year before the pandemic lockdown. When Covid appeared in 2020, along with layoffs and closings, it led to a career swerve for Van Til, a working mom who was a sommelier at Pappas Steakhouse. She took over the wine program at The Clubs at Houston Oaks, a posh (initiation fees can range into the six figures) members-only club northwest of the city with 10 lodges, 17 lakes, 900 acres and six dining options. Speaking of lots of good food and vino, the club’s 2022 Wine and Food Classic is this February 12 — it’s a great chance to taste hundreds of wines from around the world and learn about them from winemakers and professionals. “It’s our largest event of the year and it’s open to the public.” In our Q&A, Rachel dishes on her favorite date night, best wines to try this year and her brush with the me-too movement!

Keep Reading Show less
People + Places

HOUSTON IS HOME to hundreds of steakhouses, but the Museum District has been pretty barren of big beef — until now.

Keep Reading Show less
Food