Iconic 'Darth Vader House' Sells

IT TOOK OVER the internet when it first listed, and now, West U's iconic "Darth Vader House" has a new owner.


The mansion at 3201 University Blvd. is an icon familiar not only to Houstonians, but to Star Wars fans around the globe. Nicknamed such for its resemblance to the villain's helmet, it hit the market in May for $4.3 million, causing quite a stir on the interwebs, seeing as the previous owner famously turned down interviews and photo ops.

Real estate aficionados and movie buffs alike enjoyed flipping through the image gallery, which revealed a counterintuitively light, open interior. A sunken portion of the living room makes a unique seating area, surrounded by curiously patterned concrete and stone flooring; other oddly shaped areas are found throughout the home, which has a distinctly '80s, yet surprisingly fresh, vibe.

Last listed for $3.1 million by Wade Knight and Nadia Carron of Martha Turner Sotheby's International Realty, the property officially sold this week. Time will tell what the new homeowners choose to keep and forego.

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