MFAH Welcomes Exclusive Items from New York's Jewish Museum, Prepares to Open Permanent Gallery

Menorah, 1963, New Paltz

IN PARTNERSHIP WITH New York’s Jewish Museum, the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston has just unveiled a collection of “exceptional objects” called Beauty and Ritual, on view through Sept. 18.


The MFAH acquired the Montegiore Mainz Mahzor, one of the earliest surviving prayer books from Central Europe, calligraphed and illustrated around 1310 — 150 years before Gutenberg would print his Bible in the same medieval town of Mainz. “Now, with this significant partnership with The Jewish Museum, New York, and access to their extraordinary collections, we are able to amplify the cultural and artistic history of Judaism,” said Director Gary Tinterow in a statement.

Among the 140 pieces on display in three separate galleries for Beauty and Ritual are ceremonial objects to beautify and protect the Torah; Judaica used for and on the Sabbath; and that which showcases menorahs.

The ongoing collaboration between the two institutions has been in the works for two years, the culmination of which is a dedicated gallery for Judaica, one of only a handful in North America. Together, the Jewish Museum in New York and the MFAH will bring important pieces of Jewish ceremonial art to Houston over the next several years. The Albert and Ethel Herzstein Gallery for Judaica is slated to open at the MFA in early 2023.

Torah Ark, 18th century, Westheim bei Hassfurt

Torah binder, 1662-63, Verona

A 19th-century Polish spice container

Art + Entertainment
Alto Rideshare Names Its Top Spots for Houston Restaurant Weeks!

HOUSTON FOODIES ARE out this month, and those in the know are getting from restaurant to restaurant in the rideshare service that has taken the industry by a storm.

Keep ReadingShow less

THE NEW FALL Issue of Houston CityBook is hitting newsstands and mailboxes all over town now, featuring identical twin models Johnathan and John Calton. The unique cover highlights the return of one of the magazine’s best-loved recurring features: Duos.

Keep ReadingShow less
Art + Entertainment

DeQuina Moore as Poet Lauren in Plumshuga (Photo by Amitava Sarkar)

HOUSTON CITYBOOK WASN'T the first to describe Houston ballet dancer Lauren Anderson as a legend, as we did in 2018, nor shall we be the last. And now her compelling story — a rise and fall and rise again — is a highly anticipated new show at Stages.

Keep ReadingShow less
Art + Entertainment