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Flying High

Once again, Hurricane Harvey can’t stop the generosity or sink the spirits of arts patrons. The Houston Ballet held its biggest ball ever in a tent outside the Houston Ballet Center for Dance, which was outfitted by The Events Company in contrasting black-and-white floors, linens, centerpieces and chandeliers, nodding to the Swan Lake theme. Chair Hallie Vanderhider also channeled the theme, donning a custom Naeem Khan gown — one of several dresses she wore that night — with a skirt of feathers. Even the food was prepared a la Swan Lake, including a Black & White Deconstructed dessert with chocolate ganache and truffles topped with white cake and white chocolate accents. Thanks to a killer silent auction — two weeks at an Italian villa, anyone? — the Ballet Ball raised a whopping $1.4 million.

Jenny Antill, Priscilla Dickson and Wilson Parish


People + Places
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Even in a pandemic, the arts culture of Houston never stops — from movie screenings in the wee hours of the morning, to public art installations that light up the night. Seven photographers capture the everyday wonders of art in the most resilient city in America, over the course of 24 hours on Saturday, Oct. 3.


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Art + Entertainment

As the world capital of the traditional energy business, Houston's economic future rests on its ability to evolve with the changing demands on the energy sector. Bobby Tudor, chairman of energy advisory firm Tudor Pickering Holt & Co. and board chair of the Greater Houston Partnership, knows this well. But in a city long driven and enriched by the oil and gas industry, how well will his message go over? Tudor's address to the Partnership's 2020 Annual Meeting on the topic earlier this year has been called a turning point, with the local energy community accepting his call to take on a leadership role in the coming transition to renewables and greener standards. In an excerpt from the new publication, Houston Business Insider: The Metro Region's Official Economic Development Guide, produced by the Partnership in conjunction with CityBook, Tudor spoke about the challenges at hand — and what Houston is doing about it.

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People + Places
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