A Gallery Should Be About More Than Buying and Selling Art, Says Newly Minted Gallerist Janice Bond

Fred Agho
A Gallery Should Be About More Than Buying and Selling Art, Says Newly Minted Gallerist Janice Bond

FOR NATIVE HOUSTONIAN, cultural architect and art advisor Janice Bond, who opened Art Is Bond at 4411 Montrose to great fanfare in September 2022, a gallery has the potential to be so much more than a storefront for rarefied objects. “I feel like my work has a bit more dimension than just the purchasing and selling of art,” says Bond.


Bond describes Art Is Bond as a project space, and the vibe is definitely more non-profit than white cube. “4411 Montrose was chosen with deep intention,” says Bond of the location, home to forward-thinking veteran gallerists as Barbara Davis, David Shelton and Anya Tish. “The building has history. And it was imperative to show and share that there are many ways to support and engage the art world and creativity, particularly in Houston.”

Art Is Bond is not only a place to exhibit work of acclaimed Houston and global artists of the African diaspora, but a space for a non-profit to host a fundraiser, or a group of budding collectors to gather and learn more about the local and international art scene. With that mind, more than 2,000 books and catalogs from Bond’s personal archive are available in the gallery as part of a public reading room, where people can ask questions and learn more about art history and collecting. Early in her hyphenated career, Bond wasn’t sure where to begin when it came to collecting art, and sought advice from Patric McCoy, co-founder and president of Diasporal Rhythms, an organization dedicated to the appreciation of artists of the African diaspora. “He said, ‘I collect art like I collect music,’” says Bond. “Do you like the song? Buy the record!”

'Cheeks' by Colby Deal

'Mildred Bradley' by Colby Deal


With an eye on bringing Houston artists even more international recognition, Bond divides her time between her hometown and Portugal, her “family base,” where her husband Sergio and their four children live in a village with a long history as an artisan community. Currently on view at Art Is Bond, after a successful show last December by Ghanaian painter and graffiti artist Kingsley Kofi Deffor, is an exhibit of portraits, landscapes, and still lifes taken in Houston’s Third Ward by analog photographer Colby Deal. In March, the gallery will show Houston-born multidisciplinary artist Lovie Olivia.

“We’re not a final concept yet,” says Bond of her new gallery. “We’ll evolve as the community and the world shapes us.”

Art + Entertainment
Cool for ‘Schools’! CIS Wants to Transport You to a Whimsical ‘Wonderland’ at Milestone Gala

CIS 2024 Gala Honorary Co-Chair Judy Tate, Co-Chair Lauren Brollier, Co-Chair Cassie Milam, Honorary Co-Chair Kirby McCool

WHETHER YOU PREFER Alice, the Mad Hatter or the Queen of Hearts, Communities In Schools of Houston’s A Night in Wonderland 45th Anniversary GalaA Night in Wonderland 45th Anniversary Galais not to be missed! Join in the celebration for a whimsical good time on Thursday, April 4th, at the luxurious Post Oak Hotel.

Keep ReadingShow less

David Ansell, Bennie Flores Ansell, Thuy Tran and James Tiebout

THE ROTHKO CHAPEL held its Inspirit fundraiser — a celebration of the power of art and activism — at the industrial-chic Astorian. The evening featured cocktails, hors d’oeuvres, and an onstage conversation with actor Cheech Marin, one of the world’s foremost collectors of Chicano art; 2023 Art League of Houston Texas Artist of the Year Vincent Valdez; and legendary civil rights advocate Dolores Huerta, who co-founded the United Farm Workers of America with César Chávez. (She’s 93, by the way!)

Keep ReadingShow less
Art + Entertainment
A FEW SHORT years ago, the Covid pandemic had the whole world questioning if the travel and hospitality industries would ever recover. In a report released this week by Houston First Corporation, the region's marketing organization, it seems that those sectors in Houston not only bounced back, but are continuing on a strong upward trajectory.
Keep ReadingShow less
People + Places