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In April, Houston-reared indie-folk singer-songwriter SHERITA PEREZ and her drummer boyfriend Nick Melcher departed on a three-week tour of California, in support of her new single “Blue Skies.” Being a full-time musician — especially one who tours — is not an easy life, but it’s one the free spirit is content to be living. “I just want to have beautiful experiences in beautiful places with beautiful people,” she says. Perez, who gigs constantly — “You have to be able to jump when people say jump” — believes that a positive outlook is key to her success. “This is just the beginning.”
In April, Houston-reared indie-folk singer-songwriter SHERITA PEREZ and her drummer boyfriend Nick Melcher departed on a three-week tour of California, in support of her new single “Blue Skies.” Being a full-time musician — especially one who tours — is not an easy life, but it’s one the free spirit is content to be living. “I just want to have beautiful experiences in beautiful places with beautiful people,” she says. Perez, who gigs constantly — “You have to be able to jump when people say jump” — believes that a positive outlook is key to her success. “This is just the beginning.”

In April, Houston-reared indie-folk singer-songwriter Sherita Perez and her drummer boyfriend Nick Melcher departed on a three-week tour of California, in support of her new single “Blue Skies.” Being a full-time musician — especially one who tours — is not an easy life, but it’s one the free spirit is content to be living. “I just want to have beautiful experiences in beautiful places with beautiful people,” she says. Perez, who gigs constantly — “You have to be able to jump when people say jump” — believes that a positive outlook is key to her success. “This is just the beginning.”


Perez, who colors her hair at Fringe Salon, will not disclose her age, announcing that she’s “as old as the stars and as young as the spring flowers.” She wears a Conchita Lucas scarf, $175, at Tootsies.

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