Houston-Based Olive Oil Brand Gives Free Product to Struggling Local Restaurants

CHO AMERICA, THE purveyor of premium Tunisian olive oil brands like Terra Delyssa, Origin 846, Fork & Leaf and Bulk By CHO, is working with restaurants in Houston and across the nation by offering them free premium olive and cooking oils in order to help them mitigate financial issues stemming from shutdowns caused by the COVID-19 pandemic.


To participate in the program, which runs through the end of April, local restaurant owners can register at CHO America's Bulk By CHO website and then visit the brand's Houston office to pick up their premium olive and cooking oils. The aim of the program is to help keep independent restaurants open by allowing them to put the money they would normally spend buying oil in bulk back into their beleaguered businesses.

"We are very excited to help the community and support local businesses. We realize many restaurants are still dealing with issues stemming from shutdowns due to the COVID-19 pandemic," said CHO America's CEO Wajih Rekik in a statement.

"These are restaurants in our own communities, restaurants where we have our Friday office lunch, where we used to enjoy our social and family gatherings, restaurants that make the charm and the beauty of our cities," Rekik added. "I am heartbroken to see so many of them on the brink of collapse and some already closed for good. Our help, though symbolic, we hope will come as a boost of positive energy, a reminder of how appreciated these restaurants are and how much we look forward to having them as part of our return to normal."

The olives that make up CHO's oil, products of Tunisia's ideal olive-growing environment, are handpicked and processed within 24 hours, which helps preserve the flavor and quality of the fruit since heat can adversely alter the taste, the company says.

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