Karbach Brews up $10,000 Grants to Support Struggling Texas Ranchers

Karbach Brews up $10,000 Grants to Support Struggling Texas Ranchers

EVERY TEXAN HAS taken a hit this past year, but it's been a particularly tough for the state's agricultural community, which the USDA estimates has lost $6 to $8 billion due to the ongoing pandemic. Those losses were further compounded by the Texas electric-grid-damaging winter storm Uri, which the Texas Farm Bureau estimates caused an additional $600 million in losses.


Houston-based Karbach Brewing Co. wants to help. The all-star local brewery, which launched its new Ranch Water hard seltzers back in January, announced its Restoring the Ranch Program earlier this week, with the goal of raising awareness about the recent challenges of the Texas ranch industry and providing two Texas ranchers with $10,000 grants ($20,000 in total) to help them rebuild and replenish their land.

"Karbach is always exploring new ways to help our Texas community, and with the release of Ranch Water in January, it felt like the natural time to step up and do something for our brothers and sisters in the Texas agricultural community. They have not had an easy year by any means, but surprisingly their situation is one that doesn't get talked about enough among Texans," said David Graham, Karbach's director of marketing, in a statement. "That's why we're especially proud to launch the Karbach Restoring the Ranch program, to not only give back to two deserving folks in the agriculture industry, but to further amplify the conversation around how Texas can come together to support farmers and ranchers."

From April 26 to June 1, Texans can nominate struggling farmers or ranchers in their life or self-nominate for a chance to win the first of the Karbach Restoring the Ranch program's $10,000 grants. Submissions can be made in two ways. In order to make a social media submission, submitters can create an Instagram post featuring a photo of their nominee, using the hashtag #KarbachRanchWaterContest, that includes a caption detailing why they chose their nominee and how they would utilize the grant money. Submitters can also complete a microsite submission by visiting the program's website and following the site's online instructions.

Entrants of the program must be above the age of 21 and must currently own or be employed by a ranch or farm in Texas that is greater than 50 acres in size.

"Without the Texas agriculture community, the restaurant industry we all rely on wouldn't exist," continued Graham in his statement. "So we owe it to them to help out however we can."

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