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Local restaurants are getting creative with ways to earn your ongoing business. The latest craze? Make-your-own cocktail kits — alcohol included!


Hugo Ortega’s Hugorita kit ($44, serves 8) comes with El Jimador Blanco tequila, fresh-squeezed lime juice, Gran Gala orange liqueur and housemade orange-agave nectar cordial. Ortega’s Backstreet Café's Bloody Mary version includes a bottle of Grey Goose and housemade Bloody Mary mix, and there's also a mimosa kit with a bottle of sparkling wine and your choice of orange or wildberry juice.

Hugo Ortega’s Hugorita kitHugo Ortega’s Hugorita kit

Goode Co. Taqueria and Goode Co. Kitchen & Cantina are also proffering a Damn Goode Margarita kit, with housemade mix and tequila optional (in case you have your own stash).

Dish Society and Empire Café have mouthwatering mimosa bundles, as does Agricole Hospitality’s Revival Market.

Another Agricole concept, Eight Row Flint, has packaged up the ingredients for three of its most popular creations: the Ranchwater, margarita and Old Fashioned; the restaurant group’s Vinny’s in EaDo offers kits to make Old Fashioned cocktails, mimosas and Aperol margaritas.

Meanwhile, Underbelly Hospitality is offering add-your-own-booze batched cocktails, dreamed up by beverage director Westin Galleymore.

AT TOP: Revival Market's mimosa bundle

Dispatches
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Even in a pandemic, the arts culture of Houston never stops — from movie screenings in the wee hours of the morning, to public art installations that light up the night. Seven photographers capture the everyday wonders of art in the most resilient city in America, over the course of 24 hours on Saturday, Oct. 3.


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As the world capital of the traditional energy business, Houston's economic future rests on its ability to evolve with the changing demands on the energy sector. Bobby Tudor, chairman of energy advisory firm Tudor Pickering Holt & Co. and board chair of the Greater Houston Partnership, knows this well. But in a city long driven and enriched by the oil and gas industry, how well will his message go over? Tudor's address to the Partnership's 2020 Annual Meeting on the topic earlier this year has been called a turning point, with the local energy community accepting his call to take on a leadership role in the coming transition to renewables and greener standards. In an excerpt from the new publication, Houston Business Insider: The Metro Region's Official Economic Development Guide, produced by the Partnership in conjunction with CityBook, Tudor spoke about the challenges at hand — and what Houston is doing about it.

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