Art on the Bayou! Downtown’s Fly New Mural

THERE'S NO SHORTAGE of wildlife along the ample trails that line the city's bayous, but soon cyclists, joggers and walkers alike will be able to take in wildlife in another dimension — 2D, that is. Coming soon to the Bayou Greenway trail, at the confluence of White Oak and Buffalo Bayous, right next to the University of Houston-Downtown's One Main Building, is a wildlife-themed mural by Ink Dwell studio co-founder and artist Jane Kim that will showcase some of the birds that make their home in our city's bayous. San Francisco-based Kim is responsible for dozens of public installations across the country highlighting the migration patterns of wildlife.


The Downtown project, announced recently by the Houston Parks Board and Buffalo Bayou Partnership, will be titled Confluence. The behemoth mural, which clocks in at 223 feet in length, will be divided up into three different sections that each feature a variety of birds that rest their tailfeathers along the city's bayous during different seasons of the year. Houston is geographically in the center of North America's largest migratory flyway.

"Houston is one of the most diverse cities in the United States," says Kim, "and that's not just limited to its people. The region's wetlands attract a spectacular array of bird life, and Confluence is a monument to that beauty and diversity."

Behind the birds will be painted a map of Houston's bayous, which will bring movement and energy to the piece.

"The bayous define our city, bringing wildlife and nature to our own backyards," said Beth White, President and CEO of Houston Parks Board in a statement. "We hope that this mural will be a focal point for trail users and encourage Houstonians to learn more about the waterways that make Houston unique."

Installation of the mural began in early March of this year and is expected to be finished in another couple of weeks.

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