Gerald Hines’ $34.5 Million Estate Hits the Market

Gerald Hines' River Oaks estate / Photo by Sonya Bertolino

The estate of Gerald Hines, one of the world's most successful developers, and namesake of the University of Houston's architecture school, who passed away in August at the age of 95, has hit the market. Hines' River Oaks villa at 2920 Lazy Lane is listed for $34.5 million by Douglas Elliman Texas' Cathy Cagle and Patricia Reed.


The 4.5-acre property, situated on the famous street between Buffalo Bayou and Kirby Dr., has five bedrooms and 11 bathrooms, plus a 3,000-square-foot atrium with an enclosed pool and tennis court. The home, designed by Robert A.M. Stern Architects and completed in 1992, was initially inspired by holidays spent in Tuscany. Traditional elements — inlaid floors, chandeliers, a lacquered-wood-wrapped library, marble-bedecked bathrooms — abound.

Hines' credits include the Galleria and Pennzoil Place in Houston, as well as other iconic structures the world over — like New York's oval-shaped and pinkish Lipstick Building by architect Philip Johnson, and Frank Gehry's half-traditional, half-spectacle DZ Bank building off the Brandenburg Gate in Berlin. Founded in 1957, Hines' private Houston-based company, known simply as Hines, has 4,820 employees worldwide and does business in 25 countries, with about $144.1 billion of assets under management. He developed or acquired well more than 1,400 projects — as close as a few blocks from this very River Oaks mansion and as far away as Beijing.

"I just like building," Hines told CityBook editor Jeff Gremillion in 2015, who was on assignment for Houston magazine at the time. "And I like great architecture. Some people have scorecards for just money, but ours is a lot more than that. It's about creating better places."

Home + Real Estate
Thrive + Inspire: Former Texans President Rootes Says ‘Commit to Pushing Back’

AN INTERVIEW WITH Jamey Rootes, former President of the Houston Texans

When did you know that something big was going to impact Houston? It was 7:30am on Wednesday, March 11, 2020, and I was participating in one of the first-ever meetings of the Greater Houston Partnership Executive Committee to be conducted via Zoom. The normal public policy and economic development focused agenda was hijacked by a discussion regarding the potentially devastating impact of a new and highly contagious virus. It was hypothesized that this virus, the novel coronavirus, could absolutely overrun the capacity of our local health system. I was skeptical. I thought, "We have the largest medical center in the world. It would take something of biblical proportions to exhaust our medical capacity." As I learned, Covid-19 was pounding Europe, especially Italy, but we had yet to have a documented case of community spread in Houston. That was all about to change.

Keep Reading Show less
People + Places

CALL IT NAKED ambition. This holiday, Houston's top jewelers tout baubles beautiful enough to pair with the season's most festive fashions — or with nothing but a luxurious fragrance from centuries-old Parisian perfumer House of Creed, which just opened a Galleria boutique.

Keep Reading Show less
Style

The Pesce Spada alla Siciliana at Trattoria Sofia is one of several fish-forward dishes at new Italian restaurants opening all over Houston for holiday dining.

MUCH LIKE BUZZY trattorias across Italy during the holidays, Champagne corks pop, flutes clink and white lights twinkle among a hum of international chatter at newly rebranded Alba Ristorante in Hotel Granduca. Owner Giorgio Borlenghi named Alba for both a city in northern Italy that's celebrated for its white truffles and the Italian word for "a new beginning." With an alluring setting and menu, it's just one of several new Italian spots — each one unique, from lavish to chic and upbeat American-Italian.

Keep Reading Show less
Food